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WELCOME TO THE BALEARICS


Fine sandy beaches, hidden coves, bustling harbours and private marinas… With so many attractions, it's not surprising that Majorca, Menorca, Ibiza and Formentera are the meccas of yachting!


Prepare to be amazed by the cosmopolitan atmosphere of Palma, the architectural wonders of Ciutadella de Minorca, the paradise beaches of Formentera and Ibiza's trendy bars. In the Balearic Islands, you can hop between sleepy fishing villages and touristy city centres, checking out the secluded beaches and steep cliffs along the way. The archipelago is so diverse that there's something for everyone!

Available yachts

Look at our selection of yachts in the Balearics

Not to be missed

The location

Nestling between steep cliffs or covered in fine white sand, the bays of the Balearics are home to some of the Mediterranean's most beautiful beaches! Here are five locations that you really shouldn't miss during your stay:

Covering three miles, Es Trenc is the archipelago's longest beach. It's like being in the Caribbean!

Another top destination: Playa de Ses Illetes in Formentera, one of the world's best beaches according to the travel site TripAdvisor.

Cala Salada in Ibiza is worth a longer look. Soft sand, clear water… A picture postcard! Formed by two beaches separated by a rocky cliff, it's an ideal spot to enjoy the scenery and relax.

Also unmissable is the craggy uninhabited islet of Sa Dragonera lying to the west of Majorca. It's a nature reserve home to rare seabirds and lizards.

Another little corner of paradise: Dragon Caves near Porto Christo in Majorca, which surround one of Europe's largest underground lakes.


Suggested itinerary

Seven days around Majorca

Check out all the Balearics' beauty and diversity by touring Majorca and stopping off in Menorca!

Day 1: Palma de Mallorca – Port Andratx

What would you say to setting sail and leaving the stress of everyday life behind you? Your first destination: Port Andratx, a quaint little fishing village that has a luxurious yacht club, excellent gastronomy and the island's highest property prices.

Day 2: Puerto de Andratx – Puerto de Sóller

First stop-off on the protected islet of Sa Dragonera.

To do: hike up the 100-ft. cliff. During your crossing to Puerto de Sóller, you can try to take in the size and scale of the imposing Tramuntána massif. When you reach Puerto de Sóller, hop aboard the old trams that wind their way through the orange and lemon trees to the foot of the mountain village Sóller.

Day 3: Puerto de Sóller – Puerto de Pollença

Stop off at Cala de Sa Calobra to take on the Torrent de Pareis, one of the Balearics' most scenic hiking trails. Later, the captain will put down anchor in Puerto de Pollença. From there, you can visit the picturesque mountain village of the same name.

Day 4: Puerto de Pollença – Ciutadella de Minorca

In the morning, your anchor point will be in Cala de Coll Baix, an inlet at the foot of a rock face that's still escaped mass tourism. During your travels across Menorca, you really should spend some time in one of the area's most stunning locations to explore the Citadel, patrician palaces and the winding streets of the Old Town.

Day 5: Ciutadella de Minorca – Cala Figuera

You can enjoy the Caribbean feel of your morning in the hidden cove of Cala Turqueta! Check out the uninterrupted views of the Mediterranean during the crossing to Majorca. There's nothing quite like Cala Figuera with its green boathouses. You're in Majorca's quaintest fishing village!

Day 6: Cala Figuera – Es Trenc Bay

Majorca's southeast coast is home to a string of spectacular white sandy bays. Your next destination: Es Trenc, a three-mile-long beach lying between the dunes and turquoise blue waters. Grab a cocktail and watch the stunning sunset from one of the many beach bars.

Day 7: Es Trenc Bay – Palma de Mallorca

It's the morning after the night before… Have a swim in the warm water. In Palma, you can explore the Old Town's bars, La Llotja, the patio of the Royal Rotary Club and the other secrets to be uncovered in the capital of the Balearics.

Seven days around Majorca
Check out all the Balearics' beauty and diversity by touring Majorca and stopping off in Menorca!
Day 1: Palma de Mallorca – Port Andratx
What would you say to setting sail and leaving the stress of everyday life behind you? Your first destination: Port Andratx, a quaint little fishing village that has a luxurious yacht club, excellent gastronomy and the island's highest property prices.
Day 2: Puerto de Andratx – Puerto de Sóller
First stop-off on the protected islet of Sa Dragonera.
To do: hike up the 100-ft. cliff. During your crossing to Puerto de Sóller, you can try to take in the size and scale of the imposing Tramuntána massif. When you reach Puerto de Sóller, hop aboard the old trams that wind their way through the orange and lemon trees to the foot of the mountain village Sóller.
Day 3: Puerto de Sóller – Puerto de Pollença
Stop off at Cala de Sa Calobra to take on the Torrent de Pareis, one of the Balearics' most scenic hiking trails. Later, the captain will put down anchor in Puerto de Pollença. From there, you can visit the picturesque mountain village of the same name.
Day 4: Puerto de Pollença – Ciutadella de Minorca
In the morning, your anchor point will be in Cala de Coll Baix, an inlet at the foot of a rock face that's still escaped mass tourism. During your travels across Menorca, you really should spend some time in one of the area's most stunning locations to explore the Citadel, patrician palaces and the winding streets of the Old Town.
Day 5: Ciutadella de Minorca – Cala Figuera
You can enjoy the Caribbean feel of your morning in the hidden cove of Cala Turqueta! Check out the uninterrupted views of the Mediterranean during the crossing to Majorca. There's nothing quite like Cala Figuera with its green boathouses. You're in Majorca's quaintest fishing village!
Day 6: Cala Figuera – Es Trenc Bay
Majorca's southeast coast is home to a string of spectacular white sandy bays. Your next destination: Es Trenc, a three-mile-long beach lying between the dunes and turquoise blue waters. Grab a cocktail and watch the stunning sunset from one of the many beach bars.
Day 7: Es Trenc Bay – Palma de Mallorca
It's the morning after the night before… Have a swim in the warm water. In Palma, you can explore the Old Town's bars, La Llotja, the patio of the Royal Rotary Club and the other secrets to be uncovered in the capital of the Balearics.

Practical informations

The Checklist
Time zone: UTC +1
Currency: Euro (€)
Travel documents: identity card for EU citizens or passport
Language: Spanish
Vaccinations: None
Recommended Period: April to October
23°
12h/day in average
210mm rain per year
29° in average
When to go
In the Balearics, the high season reigns as there are 330 days of sunshine every year! The weather is at its best from April to October: the climate is warm and dry. The average highs are 19°C in April and 29°C in August. The only bad weather is in the low season. Even in November and March, the temperatures are still pleasant. In autumn, the water temperature stays warm (October: 23.5°C).
In July and August, you should expect heat and crowds. But your holiday in the Balearics will still be relaxing aboard your yacht. The tourist season is long and only Menorca is relatively free of mass tourism.
Back to harbour
Few destinations can boast such extensive facilities in their marinas and accommodate all sorts of yachts. In Majorca, the Philippe Starck-designed Port Adriano includes luxurious boutiques, stylish restaurants and trendy bars at the foot of the jetty. Other marinas such as Port Andratx stand out because of their pool and particularly exclusive yacht club. In the high season, it's strongly recommended to book a mooring. If you have your own yacht, you can easily explore the coastline and surrounding fishing villages, which are accessible by small boat.
Staying shipshape
For a trip around Majorca and short stop on one of the neighbouring islands, allow a good week. Even a short stay is an option given the many activities and attractions that the Balearics provide. Anchoring is not allowed in some areas to protect the seabed whilst others are access-restricted and subject to special regulations. On the small island of Cabrera, for example, preregistration is required. Mooring is only permitted at specific sites (strongly recommended!). But mooring and water sports are unrestricted in all other bays outside the bathing areas.

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